Category Archives: Physics

Working on Motion skills

In addition to working on my video-editing skills in Final Cut Pro X recently, I have also spent some time looking into Motion by Apple to design a few drafts for new animated logos for the ATLAS Collaboration.

We’ve already used a first draft for one of the animations in our recent summary of the ATLAS ICHEP 2020 highlights and I am still working a few more ideas.

Continue reading Working on Motion skills

Working on the Final Cut

I spent the last couple of days working on my Final Cut Pro X skills, preparing some videos for the ICHEP 2020 communication campaign of the ATLAS Collaboration.

We have asked some of our conference speakers, presenting some of the physics highlights of ATLAS during the conference to answer a few questions about their talk and the featured results and put together five video clips to be featured on the ATLAS Facebook page and in shorter teasers on the ATLAS Twitter channel.

Continue reading Working on the Final Cut

Colliding Colour

May I present ‘Colliding Colour’.

A little art project, inspired by particle physics collisions, that I have been fiddling around with for a while now. Here you can see “Collision #7”, one of the results of the current setup.

Just like in a collision in the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, particles of colour collide at high energy and create a seemingly chaotic pattern in the detector. Admittedly, the energies are nowhere near those at the LHC and unlike in (real) high-energy collisions the outgoing ‘particles’ are still those that went into the collision, but yet there is a few commonalities. It is also coloured particles that collide in the LHC and the conservation of energy and momentum holds also in the Colliding Colours setup (even on a classical level).

If you want to see more, please have at my project page or directly on Instagram or Twitter.

You can find a making-of video for ‘Collision #8’ on YouTube.

Let me take you on a tour to the ATLAS Experiment

Today we published a 360-degree guided video tour to the ATLAS Experiment I recorded already back in February and recently finished editing.
You won’t need a helmet or solid shoes for this tour and you’re welcome to bring your kids along. This special tour will even take you places you wouldn’t be able to see on a regular tour on site, and you’ll have the chance to look around by yourself.
Last but not least, you can get yourself a Google Cardboard, put your mobile phone into it and enjoy the tour in virtual reality, making it an even more immersive experience.

It’s my second larger Final Cut Pro project after our little ATLAS–LEGO-stop-motion stay-at-home activity :)